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Birds in Art 2022!

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Birds in Art Leigh Yawkey Woodson Art Museum Wausau, Wisconsin September 10 – November 27, 2022 "Mexican Eagles" ​Oil on 1/2" gessoed maple panel, 28 x 50in I am honored to share that my painting “Mexican Eagles” has the prestigious honor to be included in the 2022 Birds in Art exhibition at the Leigh Yawkey Woodson Art Museum, September 10 through November 27, 2022, in Wausau, Wisconsin. Organized annually since 1976 by the Leigh Yawkey Woodson Art Museum, Birds in Art presents the very best contemporary artistic interpretations of birds and related subject matter. Each year, a jury selects approximately 100 works to take part in the exhibit. This year, 569 artists from around the world submitted. Robert is one of approximately 94 juried artists selected for the exhibit; the show will also include the work of many master wildlife artists. Birds in Art opens September 10, coinciding with Wausau’s Artrageous Weekend, a two-day, three-event art extravaganza on both sides

New work from artists and students in my mentoring studio!

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I often say that I have the privilege of working with some very talented artists in my Mentoring Studios. Each week brings new challenges, questions, and of course, new paintings and drawings. Below are a handful of recent works that were painted and drawn by some of the artists and students I work with. You will see that there is a wide range of subjects from stilllifes, animals, people to water and sunsets and different mediums. I hope you enjoy their new pieces! Stilllife, Oil by Paula Smith. Thursday evening mentoring studio. Wildlife, African Wild Dog, Oil by Jan Priddy. Tuesday morning mentoring studio. Wildlife, Snowy Egret, Graphite Pencil by Rich Turney. Thursday morning mentoring studio. Wildlife, Goldfinch, Oil by Cindy Paris. Thursday morning mentoring studio. Sunset, Oil by Mary Lee Wetzel. Thursday morning mentoring studio. Portrait, Graphite Pencil by Katharina Robinson. Thursday evening mentoring studio. Figure, Pastel by Sonya Richeson. Thursday evening mentoring studi

Two paintings off to Tulsa!

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All framed and ready to go! Two paintings off to Tulsa!   Shipping new art out to a gallery is always a great feeling! My paintings “In my Father’s Shadow” and “Moraine Morning” are packaged up and headed out to Lovetts Gallery in Tulsa, Oklahoma. I have worked with Lovetts Gallery for the last 12 years, and I am honored to have my work included with so many other great artists. I am currently working on a few more new pieces that I plan on taking out in June. It will be great to be back in the gallery again after such a long time of being away. To see the piece that I currently have available through Lovetts visit  https://lovettsgallery.com/artists/2-dimensional/robert-caldwell "In my Father's Shadow" ​Oil on 1/2" gessoed maple panel 20 x 16 in "Moraine Morning" ​Oil on 1/2" gessoed maple panel 11 x 15 in

Yes, you should go

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  “In My Fathers Shadow” Oil on ½” gessoed panel, 20 x 16 Dedicated to my father, the man who encouraged me to enjoy the adventures of life. Where even to begin with this piece? I guess I should start with the summer of 1984 when I was eleven years old, and I had just finished my first week of Boy Scout camp. It was a great week spending time outdoors, camping, and all of the other things that go with being a Boy Scout. The older scouts were getting ready to go onto their second week of Scout camp, a 100-mile canoe trip in upstate New York, and I wanted to go. My father never batted an eye, absolutely no hesitation, “yes, you should go,” he said. On the other hand, my Mom didn't breathe easily again until I retired home safe. That was the adventure that started it all, and I have been getting out and enjoying all of the adventures that life has to offer. 1984 - Getting ready to go on my first adventure! My dad, myself, and my best friend Kendall Let's fast forward 35 years lat

Excuse me, sir, do you mind?

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  “Dining al fresco” Yellow-billed Stork Graphite on 300# Arches watercolor paper, mounted to 1/2" maple panel and varnished 15 x 7 inches After drawing the Saddle-billed Stork and Marabou Stork, I decided to draw a third, creating a series of Stork drawings from Tanzania. I vaguely remember seeing some Yellow-billed Storks in 2016 while searching for Hippos in the Serengeti, and off I went to my reference database. Although you can not see it in my drawing, the apparent reason for the Yellow-billed Storks name is because of the bright yellow of the bill. While photographing these birds, still on the lookout for Hippos, we were looking upriver, which created this long vertical feeling in the landscape, dotted with this repeating oval shape of the Yellow-billed Stork. There must have been 30-40 of these birds walking the river banks looking for their lunch. They were so engaged in their hunt for food that it was rare for them to raise their head and make eye contact with me. Inspir

Yeah, I am definitely drawing that!

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“The Stand” Marabou Stork Graphite on 300# Arches watercolor paper, mounted to 1/2" maple panel and varnished 11 x 6 inches These are such odd birds, and some would say ugly; I find them disturbingly beautiful. With its bare head, hunched shoulders, and skinny bare legs, the Marabou Stork is often referred to as the Undertaker. Not only for the way it looks but also for its vital role in the ecosystem. They eat carrion and clean the land of dead animals. Although I will stop to photograph these birds anytime when I am in Africa; my 2016 safari-inspired this particular scene. I was in the Serengeti and up and about before sunrise, in the Land Cruiser slowly driving and scanning the early morning terrain for movement. The sun was starting to hit the tops of the trees, and up ahead, I noticed a form in the top of a dead tree, a Marabou Stork. We stopped and sat back as the sun illuminated the top of the tree and brought the Undertaker into full view. That scene, for some odd reason,

Long lanky legs!

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  “Frog Legs” Saddle-billed Stork Graphite on 300# Arches watercolor paper, mounted to 1/2" maple panel and varnished 9 x 14 inches “Frog Legs” is the first drawing I drew in my Stork series, a Saddle-billed Stork. It is a beautiful bird to watch in the wild they seem sleek but comical with their movements on those long lanky legs. They have a bright red bill with a black band and a yellow frontal shield which looks like a saddle. As for most people, 2020 was a challenging year; for me, to put it simply, it was a loss of a business that I had been building for the last six years. I found myself in June 2020 realizing that my art school was most likely not going to survive the pandemic, and I spent the rest of the year working through the process of closing a business. During this time, I did not paint or draw except for instructional purposes for those students who followed me to online instruction.  In January 2021, I found myself able to focus on my art again. I decided to start